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Topic Title: Fabric Puckering
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Created On: 09/30/2007 02:26 PM
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 09/30/2007 02:26 PM
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NanaB

Posts: 46
Joined: 09/21/2007

Hi everyone. I have just bought my first ever machine, it is a 350E, I am so confused and frustrated. I won't list the 100's of questions I have all at one time. I will start with 1. No matter what weight of stabilzer I use. When I stitch a name on fabric, the fabric pukers around the design. What am I doing wrong? I have no local suport, as I bought my machine 30 miles away, and the salesperson has only been doing embroidery for 3 months, and is no help. Any advice would be so greatly appreciated. Thanks, NanaB

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NanaB
 09/30/2007 02:46 PM
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rcurrytoo

Posts: 64
Joined: 05/15/2007

Hi Nana


It could be that you are not hooping properly. I'm sure everyone has different techniques but, usually I try to make my hooping very taut and sometimes I use more than one layer of stabilizer. It all depends on the fabric and the design. I'm not very good at explaining things like this. I have found that the Embroidery Library website has very good information for hooping and stabilizers.
Here is a link


http://www.emblibrary.com/el/e...r.aspx?page=techniques

Edited: 09/30/2007 at 04:18 PM by rcurrytoo
 09/30/2007 03:10 PM
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tootles

Posts: 23
Joined: 09/16/2007

I think you need more than one layer of stabiliser and also when you put the fabric in the hoop make sure its really taught by slightly pulling the excess fabric. With dense satin stitch patterns such as monograms wrinkling can be a problem. Are you making sure the tension is ok on the presser foot? I had a 300e and found that I needed to lower it a bit to get an even stitch.
 09/30/2007 05:22 PM
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NanaB

Posts: 46
Joined: 09/21/2007

rcurrytoo,

Thank you so much for the link. I went and read up on puckering. I have tried every kind and weight of stabilzer. I am trying to embroidery on satin, maybe that is the problem. I really appreciate your help. Thanks, NanaB

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NanaB
 09/30/2007 05:28 PM
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NanaB

Posts: 46
Joined: 09/21/2007

Tootles, Thank you so much for your reply and your suggestions. I have had the fabric really, really taught. I thought maybe it was too taught. Anyways, if I am trying to embroidery on a heavy satin would I need to use 2 pieces if light ior heavy stabilizer? Thanks, NanaB

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NanaB
 09/30/2007 05:44 PM
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digimad

Posts: 4470
Joined: 08/30/2007

Hi Nana, it's good to see you, Ok fabric type, stabiliser used, density of design, loose hooping, all can effect a design.Poly cotton mixes can pucker badly and if you stretch your fabric that causes puckers.
If you are embroidering a summer blouse weight cotton use a medium cutaway. The cutaway gives stitches more support than a tear away. At least one layer must be taut as a drum so when you flick it with your finger it bounces like a drumskin.Tighten the screw with your fingers. flip it upside down and lay the edge on the edge of a table and gently tug the backing along the edges in a downward direction. Do all four sides, then flip it back and pressing your finger tips on the egde of one side gently pull the fabric up and over the hoop. do that on all sides. You have now gotten rid of any slack that existed and give the screw one turn with a screw driver, no more or you'll stretch stretch the hoop. Now present it to the machine.
If the letters you are using are satin stitch, you will find by loosening the machines top tension will give you a smoother stitch without pulling in so tightly. In fact any time you intend doing a lot of satn stitch always loosen the top tension 1 or 2 places, it releases the effect your bobbin thread has on the stitchout which is trying desperately to yank every stitch made into the centre underneath and slow the stitching speed.
You access that through the "mode" key on the bottom left of your display screen. Your screen will change and you'll see the "SET" button, press that one, and your in the settings area of your machineuse the arrows to reach the speed settings. you'll see the threads the machine can display, the auto scissors etc, just alter the bits you want. Then when you've finished, press register and then the return symbol.Now choose your design and off you go.

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digimad
 09/30/2007 05:55 PM
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NanaB

Posts: 46
Joined: 09/21/2007

Digimad, How do you know if you are using a satin stitch or not?

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NanaB
 09/30/2007 06:26 PM
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digimad

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http://www.emblibrary.com/EL/Default.aspx Select alphabets, scroll down to "Flair Alphabet" click on the small picture of the A and look at the stitching. Do you see it's nicely flat with no breaks in the stitches. It's a close fitting zigzag stitch. Now go to "Heirloom" in the list of design categories, and when that opens scroll down to " Heirloom flowers and vines" select it and select the top one on the list (I hope) A floral Heirloom Sweater Set large. When that opens left click the first design on the left and that whole design is in satin stitch.
click here to see satin and fills now if the link works you should see a large design using satin stitsh and fill stitches. Fill stitches have a very slight ribby effect. I just wish we could upload screen shots because tat would be so easy to show you the differences.

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digimad
 09/30/2007 06:43 PM
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NanaB

Posts: 46
Joined: 09/21/2007

Digimad, How cool. I get it now. You are just the best. I just restitched the design using a med cutaway stablizer, and the pucker is not as bad, but still there. Tomorrow I will try the upper thread tension thing you suggest and see what happens. I will let you know. Thanks bunches!!!!

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NanaB
 09/30/2007 07:18 PM
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digimad

Posts: 4470
Joined: 08/30/2007

You're welcome flower, nothing worse than not knowing why something doesnt work, you go through lots of things in your mind and end p wondering if its you or the machine . Satin isnt to bad to stitch on, I just did a some designs on it lately but had to loosen the top tension a little and lighten the density but increase the underlay. Not an option with purchased designs, when I first started doing machine embroidery I'd use several layers of stabilisers, it was a tip from a commercial embroiderer in the end that stopped me over stabilising designs. I found a series of very good articles on machine embroidery and stabilisers, they seldom use tear away, the looser the weave, the more support it needs, but things like chiffon, tulle and georgette will embroider fine if you use organza under itself but cross weaved, top has straight grain travelling down, base layer has straight grain travelling across. Tulle works as a stabiliser either below or on top of chiffon or organza, which is great because you dont want great white areas of stabiliser showing through sheer fabrics. Then choosing designs that dont have zillions of stitches in a small area to stitch on delicate weaves. They work best on good firm weave heavy ish cottons, denim, woven faux suedes, coating . Fleece needs a firm cutaway to prevent bagging and a soluble or heataway film on top to stop stitches burying themselves in the pile. Velvets you have to look at hard, if its nylon base weave it's not too strong and you need low to medium stitch count designs, if it's drapes velvet that's designed to stand a bit of wear and will tolerate higher stitch counts with a soft strong cutaway. Poly cotton I paint with my gloop solution, a mix of soluble film scraps melted in water until it's the consistency of thin cream but greyish white pearlescent looking. I paint it on and let it dry flat, I dont get any puckers at all. In fact I love my gloop. First came across it in the 90s as a way to kill stretch in knitwear so it could be embroidered using cutaway to support the stitches. I love it, I use it to trengthen sheers and use siluble film as a backing then simply wash the embroidered item when it's done.
digimad

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digimad
 10/08/2007 05:45 AM
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jwork46774

Posts: 12
Joined: 09/07/2007

Another thing that I learned from the OESD seminar is when you have puckering. Lay a heavy terry towel on the ironing board, turn the stitched desigh upside down on the towel and steam press it. Then let it cool withough moving it. THis takes alot of that puckering out. It puts the stitches down in the nap of the terry and lets you press the fabric. IT works!!
 10/08/2007 10:41 AM
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smbnikita

Posts: 16
Joined: 05/12/2007

NanaB,

I attended a Floriani Stabilizer seminar and she told us about this workbook that you could download from their site that tells you what type of stabilizer to use for what projects as well as how much you need to use based on teh stitch count. i hope this helps as well.

http://www.rnkdistributing.com...WorkbookStabilizer.pdf
 10/09/2007 04:48 AM
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dontpanic

Posts: 2
Joined: 10/09/2007

Hi NanaB and everyone else!
I'm new to this forum and have a 300E. The replies are right and very helpful about the stabilizers, hooping etc. I've also found that if the grain of the fabric is not straight in the hoop, designs can pucker more.

Straight grain (straight grain runs in the same direction as the selvage (finished edge) of the fabric) is the most stable. Cross grain (across from one selvage to the other) is a little less stable. And diagonal grain (45 degree angle from top corner of fabric to opposite bottom corner of fabric) is the least stable and stretches the most. (Try it...pull the fabric along the selvage and it stretches the least, pull it holding both selvages and it stretches a little more, diagonally (bias) is very stretchy. If you already know all this about fabric grain, please excuse the "lesson"!

Generally, I've found that with the right stabilizer and the fabric grain straight in the hoop, I have the least amount of puckering. If I want a design to face a certain angle, it's easier for me to turn the design using the machine's edit feature than turn the fabric off-grain.

Hope this helps!
 10/12/2007 08:08 PM
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angie

Posts: 4
Joined: 10/12/2007

Hi everyone, I'm new to this forum, but I think any information on this subject is a good thing. I would use SIA this is a preasure senitive stablizer. satin is very slippery, and you don't want to over stretch it also you don't want hoop burn. So all you have to do is apply it to the back of your hoop and the sticky side will show through the hoop then just press the satin on the sticky stuff ( if you wrinkle it just lift fabric and smooth it again) attach your hoop and sew. This eliminates hooping the satin. I hope this helps. There so many things to learn. Also this is a tear away stablizer. Have fun! .......Angie
 09/09/2009 06:05 PM
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rondaf

Posts: 7
Joined: 07/25/2009

Jwork - thank you SO much for the idea of the terry cloth towel. I had some puckering in a cotton duck fabric. I had used a med tear-away stabilizer (not that the material really needed a stabilizer), and used a 14 and 11 gauge needle (75 or 90mm). Everything was making the VERY DENSE design pucker. I tried different stabilizers (heavier and lighter to none) and nothing was helping. I tried the steaming idea and a HUGE amount of the puckering went away. I was so surprised that such an easy solution could fix my rather big problem. I love this forum!!! I learn so much.
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