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Topic Title: Washable Stabilizer
Topic Summary: Embroidery
Created On: 11/08/2008 07:47 PM
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 11/08/2008 07:47 PM
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trishybob

Posts: 90
Joined: 06/18/2008

I have accumulated quite a bit of used washable stabilizer. On one of my packages, it said to turn the used pieces into liquid stabilizer by mixing water, etc. My question is where do you use the liquid stabilizer and how do you use it? I have looked on several sites and cannot find an answer other than for lace bowls. I have some sheets that I would like to embroider a border across and thought the liquid might work on the sheets but need more info before I try it. Any help would be appreciated.
 11/09/2008 12:29 PM
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digimad

Posts: 4571
Joined: 08/30/2007

Hi Mom, I love the soluble mix, I call it Gloop. I first started using it back in the 90s for embroidering on machine knits. It's great for killing stretch, strengthening fine fabrics like chiffon or lawn. It will turn a stretchy TEE fabric into a well behaved wont stretch cant stretch fabric. I've seen recipes over the past few years advissing folks to use denatured alcohol to stop it growing mildew, but I've never used that. I add enough water to let the bits dissolve then either add more bits or water, when it's the consistency of thin cream and pearlescent looking I know it's just about right to use. I use it on both sides of the fabric, as long as the item is washable, if it's not I spray it on the surface on an area a bit larger than my design and blow dry it. After I just spritz it carefully and keep patting it with an absorbent towel. Some folks make it quite thick and paint it on silicone paper, then peel it off and re use it, others lay the larger pieces on silicone paper, cover i so they have a patchwork with no gaps, then lay more silicone paper on top and iron it. The pieces weld together to make one large sheet. You can weld two pieces of Soluble film together the same way to create a stronger film for really dense FSL designs. I love the stuff, oh and you can dab spots of it to the right side of your hooped fabric to lay a thin topping on, it fixes it in place until you are ready to unhoop your fabric and remove your top film.
Great stuff.

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digimad
 11/09/2008 04:33 PM
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CherylAnn

Posts: 3529
Joined: 05/27/2007

Hi,

I haven't tried reusing the solvy leftovers I have yet. Can the the clear soluable be mixed with the one that looks like regular stabilizer (H20 gone or other similar brand names). I know that the clear, plastic looking will work as described by you Maggie but what about the other kind.

Cheryl

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Saskatoon, Saskatchewan Canada
Janome 15000, 12000, 4120, 760, 1200D Serger, Huskylock 926, Cover Pro 1000 & a few older sewing machines; my favourite computer games of DigitizerMBX v.4.5 with Cutwork, Floriani Total Control, & EQ7
 11/09/2008 04:44 PM
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digimad

Posts: 4571
Joined: 08/30/2007

That I don't know, I've only ever used my Romeo heavy duty soluble film, mainly as I can use it for free motion work as well without a hoop. I suppose if they dissolve completely it should work. Give it a try, become a Gloop blobber

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digimad
 11/09/2008 07:40 PM
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trishybob

Posts: 90
Joined: 06/18/2008

Hi Mom:

Thanks for your response. I am going to mix up the solution and experiment with it.
I bought a roll of Villene and really like it and have used it with good results. Most of my left over is Villene. I wish there was some way to salvage some of the other left over stabilizers as it seems a shame to waste so much. I did try zig-zagging a couple pieces of the Villene together to use under a design and when the needle hit the seam, it broke and made a real mess. I learned the hard way on that one.

Pat
 11/10/2008 05:25 AM
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digimad

Posts: 4571
Joined: 08/30/2007

Hi Mom, it's the baking parchment you use for meringues, the non stick surface. Greaseproof paper won't work, ask me how I found out. They line a shallow baking tray, the type we call a swiss roll tin or baking sheet here in England, with the non stick parchment, and then paint on the Gloop, let it dry and peel it off. I've never tried it, so I can't say how well it works, I think I'd be inclined to use it for topping a design rather than as the backing, besides I enjoy using Gloop wet applied directly to my fabric. I'm like a child playing with mud pies when I'm doing it.

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digimad
 11/10/2008 10:50 AM
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digimad

Posts: 4571
Joined: 08/30/2007

Real Parchment is animal skin, very thin and used for writing or printing on, cooking parchment is paper that's coated with a grease resistant finish as in greaseproof baking sheets or silicone to create a non stick surface. It's used for cooky making, meringues, cakes etc and replaces the need to grease and flour pans.
Mock Parchment can be made by applying melted wax to a paper then rubbing over quickly, it can't be used for baking or any application that requires heat. I don't know you if you ever marbled paper as a child, floated oil or wax over water and then drops of ink, or paint, then dragged dry paper over the surface, that was a common way of creating mock parchment.
The stuff I'm on about will be in the baking section of your food stores, a totally different animal from either real Parchment (also called vellum ) or waxed paper.
There's yet another version used by papercrafters, it's transluscent and becomes opaque where you impress marks on to it. I'ce seen some stunning "lace" designs created for greetings cards from this paper. I used to be an Art and crafts teacher so that's the reason I know about the various techniques and equipment. However I myself enjoy slapping wet gooey stuff around, not in the least bit lady like.

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digimad
 11/11/2008 09:34 AM
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barb61240

Posts: 127
Joined: 05/14/2007

I've used regular wax paper before to bind together all the loose pieces of left over wash away. I just place them on a piece of wax paper, overlapping pieces so there are no holes, cover them with another piece of wax paper, iron with low/med heat, and peel off the wax paper. Has worked for me in the past. Barb
 11/11/2008 09:55 AM
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devilcat

Posts: 2226
Joined: 10/23/2007

Hi Barb, Do you have to make sure you put the bits on the unwaxed side (is there one)? Or does the wax residue have no effect?

Jacquie

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Ladysmith BC,Janome 12000, Bernina Record, Bernina 1150MDA serger, bit of a Luddite, garments not crafts
 11/11/2008 03:29 PM
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barb61240

Posts: 127
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I think both sides are waxed. I've never had any trouble. I do ...carefully...remove the top piece of wax paper while still warm.

Barb
 11/11/2008 10:43 PM
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soinsuzie

Posts: 42
Joined: 09/22/2008

Hi,
I'm not an expert but just finished a course online called "Digitized Quilting. The teacher gave us tip which might be of some help to you. She said she saves all of her good size pieces and then sews them together with the thread that washes out. Sorry, my brain just went on a holiday and can't think of the name of the thread. It's the temporary thread that one would use for temporary seams and it washes out.
She said that it might sound like a lot of work but it is well worth it. She also said that it was amazing at how much money she saved. Like you I am new to the embroidery machine and decided that I will keep the good pieces and sew them together and use the other great method suggested here. Have fun Dorothy

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Dorothy Atkinson
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